Title: Investigation of data relating to blind and partially sighted people in the quarterly Labour Force Survey: October 2012 – September 2015;
Authors: Rachel Hewett, VICTAR, University of Birmingham with Sue Keil, RNIB; Publisher: RNIB; Year of publication: 2016
 

Background

This report contains a summary of findings from a statistical analysis of data from the quarterly Labour Force Survey (LFS). It is the latest in a series of five reports produced for RNIB by the University of Birmingham. All five reports have provided an analysis of the employment status and economic activity of people with seeing difficulties. They have enabled us to track the economic activity of people disabled with a seeing difficulty since the start of the economic downturn, and to compare their circumstances with those of the general working age population.
 

Key findings

  • At all ages, and all levels of education, people long term disabled with a seeing difficulty were less likely than the rest of the working age population to be in employment. Those aged 26-44 were more likely to be ILO unemployed (for the other age groups long term disabled with seeing difficulty, the sample sizes for ILO unemployed were too small for statistical reliability).
  • People long term disabled with a seeing difficulty were more likely than the rest of the working age population to have been unemployed for 12 months or more.
  • People long term disabled with a seeing difficulty were more likely than the rest of the working age population to be long term sick or disabled, and more than twice as likely to have given up work for health reasons.
  • People long term disabled with a seeing difficulty who were in employment, were in a wide range of occupations with the highest proportion in associate professional and technical occupations and professional occupations. While most were in full-time employment, the proportion was slightly lower than for the general working age population.