Cardiff is a city divided when it comes to reading, RNIB survey reveals

Post date: 
Friday, 12 August 2016
Category: 
Wales

·        Just under a third (29 per cent) of Cardiff residents stated that they primarily read paperbacks or hardbacks on holiday

·        32 per cent of Cardiff respondents said that they prefer to read on a Kindle, smartphone or tablet

·        Contrast to the UK-wide figures which found that 48 per cent primarily read paperbacks or hardbacks on holiday, with just 21per cent choosing to read on a Kindle, smartphone or tablet

·        RNIB survey also reveals that Sir Ian McKellen (12 per cent) is the British celebrity the people of Cardiff would most like to read them a story.

It stands to reason in the digital age that people would prefer to read on a Kindle, smartphone or tablet when on holiday, saving space in their suitcase and taking advantage of cut-price deals on books.

But a survey undertaken by RNIB (Royal National Institute of Blind People) has revealed that Cardiff is a city divided, with 29 per cent of residents preferring to read paperbacks or hardbacks on holiday and 32 per cent choosing to read on a Kindle, smartphone or tablet. Just 4 per cent of those surveyed opted for audio books. 

This is in stark contrast to the rest of the UK, where almost half (48 per cent) of those surveyed said that they primarily read paperbacks or hardbacks on holiday, with just 21 per cent choosing to read on a Kindle, smartphone or tablet.

The survey of 2,023 UK adults* conducted by RNIB for the charity’s ‘Sponsor a Talking Book’ fundraising drive also revealed that Sir Ian McKellen (12 per cent) is the British celebrity the people of Cardiff would most like to read them a story.

In joint second place in Cardiff are Brian Blessed and Miranda Hart (9 per cent), with Scottish comedian, Billy Connolly close behind (8 per cent). Other suggestions included Stephen Fry and Stephen Mangan.

Carol McKinlay, RNIB Area Fundraising Manager, said: “We know that our Talking Books transform the lives of blind and partially sighted people. But we urgently need support to expand our library and give the gift of reading to even more people living with sight loss.

“We hope that local businesses and Cardiff residents will be inspired to sponsor a Talking Book and help us change the story.”

For over 80 years, RNIB’s Talking Books service has helped create a lifeline to the outside world for blind and partially sighted people, providing over one million audio books every year.

RNIB is calling on individuals, community groups and organisations to sponsor a Talking Book by setting up a JustGiving page with a target of £2,500 for an adult book or £1,500 for a children’s book.

To sponsor a Talking Book, or to find out more, visit www.rnib.org.uk/sponsortalkingbooks